Is training hard, too often, limiting your progress?

Training hard… giving it your all… applying effort… pulling your thumb out of your ass… Let’s face it, results do not come to those who haven’t mastered the art of pushing themselves out of their comfort zone. Your body adapts positively only when it is stressed sufficiently. Stimuli may come in the form of more repetitions, more sets, greater load, less rest, higher velocity, slower tempo, increased range of movement or even including isometrics. It isn’t difficult to make a training session more challenging, it just means you have to work harder. The problem is, those that do work hard tend not to take their recovery seriously. It may sound controversial, but not every training session nee

Is training hard, too often, limiting your progress?

Training hard… giving it your all… applying effort… pulling your thumb out of your ass… Let’s face it, results do not come to those who haven’t mastered the art of pushing themselves out of their comfort zone. Your body adapts positively only when it is stressed sufficiently. Stimuli may come in the form of more repetitions, more sets, greater load, less rest, higher velocity, slower tempo, increased range of movement or even including isometrics. It isn’t difficult to make a training session more challenging, it just means you have to work harder. The problem is, those that do work hard tend not to take their recovery seriously. It may sound controversial, but not every training session nee

Make Your Cardio More Effective

Specific conditioning sessions are essential for competitive athletes, that goes without saying, however they're also extremely important for non-athletes too! Cardiovascular exercise comes in many many forms and it can help with weight management, reduce risk of metabolic disease, increase cardiac output and stroke volume, increase lung capacity and significantly improve general makers of health and well-being. We all know this. Cardiovascular exercise helps keep us healthy. The problem is that so many blogs plastered all over social media have made people think that cardio will negatively impact your physique due to its potential catabolic effects. This is nothing but utter b***ocks! Yes,

Make Your Cardio More Effective

Specific conditioning sessions are essential for competitive athletes, that goes without saying, however they're also extremely important for non-athletes too! Cardiovascular exercise comes in many many forms and it can help with weight management, reduce risk of metabolic disease, increase cardiac output and stroke volume, increase lung capacity and significantly improve general makers of health and well-being. We all know this. Cardiovascular exercise helps keep us healthy. The problem is that so many blogs plastered all over social media have made people think that cardio will negatively impact your physique due to its potential catabolic effects. This is nothing but utter b***ocks! Yes,

What a day for team Cheshire Barbell!

As most of you that follow our social media accounts will know, I had the pleasure of taking a small group of lifters that I've been working with at Cheshire Barbell to the Northern Weightlifting Open today. To say all four of them did me proud is an absolute understatement! We came away with 4 medals!! It was everyone's very first weightlifting competition! All I asked of them was to focus not on achieving Personal Bests, but on looking the best. I wanted them to display their competance despite their beginner status. It certainly worked. All four achieved PBs in at lest one of their lifts and their performance was credit to all of their efforts over the last few months. Dan (16 years old -

Is stretching a waste of your time?

We've all been told that stretching is good for us. We should do it to prevent injury, warm up, cool down, do it when we wake up and before we go to bed. But is this expectation unnecessary? Is expecting this of yourself doing nothing but making you feel as though you're failing to do yet another task that we are supposed to do? Is it even beneficial? There is large body of evidence suggesting the benefits of dynamic style stretching and how it is linked to performance in explosive performance such as countermovement jump height and sprint performance. There is plenty of subjective research explaining how static stretching can significantly reduce DOMs. It is not my aim here, however, to get

Is stretching a waste of your time?

We've all been told that stretching is good for us. We should do it to prevent injury, warm up, cool down, do it when we wake up and before we go to bed. But is this expectation unnecessary? Is expecting this of yourself doing nothing but making you feel as though you're failing to do yet another task that we are supposed to do? Is it even beneficial? There is large body of evidence suggesting the benefits of dynamic style stretching and how it is linked to performance in explosive performance such as countermovement jump height and sprint performance. There is plenty of subjective research explaining how static stretching can significantly reduce DOMs. It is not my aim here, however, to get

Set up for a better pull

Does your lower back feel aggravated in the 24-48 hour period after your weightlifting training? Find that the bar comes out in front of you at the top of the pull? Jump forwards before receiving the bar? There are a number of factors that can contribute these errors, and they almost always relate to the set up. It is one area of both the Snatch and Clean that I change with every lifter that comes to work with me here at Cheshire Barbell. Take Sam, here, who attended my 2-Day Olympic Weightlifting Workshop for beginners over the weekend. He was more familiar with what I would call a hip-dominant movement style, whereby any squat or descent into the set up for the Snatch and Clean was perform

Set up for a better pull

Does your lower back feel aggravated in the 24-48 hour period after your weightlifting training? Find that the bar comes out in front of you at the top of the pull? Jump forwards before receiving the bar? There are a number of factors that can contribute these errors, and they almost always relate to the set up. It is one area of both the Snatch and Clean that I change with every lifter that comes to work with me here at Cheshire Barbell. Take Sam, here, who attended my 2-Day Olympic Weightlifting Workshop for beginners over the weekend. He was more familiar with what I would call a hip-dominant movement style, whereby any squat or descent into the set up for the Snatch and Clean was perform

Isometrics... do them!

Static holds, pauses, isometrics... whatever you want to call them, are an essential part of any athlete's programme. The problem is, no one does them! Why? Well, they're disgusting, I guess, and nobody likes to step past that comfort zone. The problem is is that the lack of isometrics in your programme might be what is holding you back. During the early stages of a lifter's development, exercise selection is easy. Once you have identified an area of weakness (whether that be physical weakness or technical), you can simply break that movement down and isolate that portion of the movement. Prioritising the improvement of that part of the puzzle by spending more time there will certainly help,

Isometrics... do them!

Static holds, pauses, isometrics... whatever you want to call them, are an essential part of any athlete's programme. The problem is, no one does them! Why? Well, they're disgusting, I guess, and nobody likes to step past that comfort zone. The problem is is that the lack of isometrics in your programme might be what is holding you back. During the early stages of a lifter's development, exercise selection is easy. Once you have identified an area of weakness (whether that be physical weakness or technical), you can simply break that movement down and isolate that portion of the movement. Prioritising the improvement of that part of the puzzle by spending more time there will certainly help,

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We'd love to hear from you

Cheshire Barbell 

Unit 17

Arkwright Court

Arkwright Road

Runcorn

Cheshire

WA7 1NX

+44 7714 232 915

karl@cheshirebarbell.co.uk